First Tuesday Replay, Sept. 1

THIS FEATURE HAS A TWO-FOLD PURPOSE: 1. TO ALLOW THOSE RECENTLY ADDED TO OUR FOLLOWER’S LIST TO LEARN ABOUT BOOKS THEY MIGHT HAVE MISSED AND 2. TO MAKE SURE PREVIOUSLY FEATURED AUTHORS AND THEIR WORK AREN’T FORGOTTEN. TODAY, WE’LL REVISIT BOOKS NOS. 6-10. IF YOU’D LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT ANY ONE OF THEM, SIMPLY CLICK ON THE “AUTHOR” PAGE, THEN ON THAT AUTHOR’S NAME.

BAndrea RaineOOK NO 6: “Turnstiles,”by Andrea Raine. Friday, June 12.

From Andrea, our first Canadian author: “Turnstiles is a literary fiction novel that focuses on family drama and social issues. The book addresses how much our social environment and people in our lives shape us. I am very interested in human relationships and social dynamics, and how people can be influenced by other people and being in different places or social situations. I also love to travel and experience new places. I enjoy stories that are character-driven where the reader can witness an internal change happening, and then everything else changes. These characters are transient and, either by choice or by force, they each leave their comfort zone at some point in their journey.

“In the summer of 1998, I embarked on a two-month solo backpacking trip through Western Europe. While I was roaming around London, I went through a tunnel under the street at Hyde Park and saw a young man in a sleeping bag. I thought maybe he was another backpacker and not necessarily a homeless person. When I returned home from the trip, I decided to start writing about him. He became a springboard for other characters to jump on the pages and for the story to unfold. Nearly sixteen years later I was holding a paperback copy of Turnstiles in my hands. My research was based on my travel experiences, some personal experiences and insights, social observations, literary knowledge, and basically being on this earth for a number of years and paying attention. The rest sprung from my imagination.”

BOOK NO 7: “Betrayal,” by Sharon Brownlie. Tuesday, June 16.

Betrayal “Betrayal is a dark, gritty, thought provoking and hard hitting novel. It addresses problems of how sexual abuse can be neglected or shelved away. The main character, Helen, looks at herself as a survivor of abuse but a victim of others’ betrayal. Sexual abuse is always a difficult subject and rightly or wrongly, Helen addresses the issue. If you liked Stieg Larson’s The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Betrayal might be a good choice.

Writes one reviewer: “In a dark and unrelentingly bleak portrait of violence, abuse, struggle and vengeance we are given a picture of a cycle that continues to feed the machinery of human trafficking. While authors such as Stieg Larson in his trilogy The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo gave us a painful, and in many ways over-the-top view of this, Sharon Brownlie puts us on a collision course with reality.”

BOOK NO. 8:  “How Not to Avoid Jet Lag,” by Joshua Brown. Friday, June 19.

ThJoshua Brownere is a little of Hunter S. Thompson in Joshua Samuel Brown’s writing, a pinch of P.J. O’Rourke, maybe even a dash of “Gulliver’s Travels.” For unlike many travel writers who draw back and write about exotic places from a safe and contemplative distance, Brown plunges right in, experiencing the good, the bad and the inedible. Ever wonder how you can tell the difference between good and not-so-good dog meat soup in Korea? Did you know that Beijing has a ghetto inhabited primarily by Muslims? Brown is counterculture savvy, technologically wired and, to some degree, able to converse in Mandarin. Yet through all 19 of these traveler’s tales, he never forgets who he is — a bewildered outsider.

None of us can, in the relatively short life span which we are allotted, go everywhere. So travel writers like Joshua do that for us — and in this case, visits some of the off-the-beaten-track and under-the-radar places we probably wouldn’t see even if we did go to that country. He eats dog meat stew so we won’t have to.

BOOK NO 9.  “Caught,” by Deirdre Thurston. Tuesday, June 23.

CAUGHT is a collection of short stories, literary sketches and vignettes, each capturing a moment in the life of someone a lot like each of us. Each story delves into human themes: expectation, desire, hope, loss, fear, joy, peace, suffering, redemption. The narrative is filled with subtle irony, humour and touching observations.  The overriding message in CAUGHT is: that any moment in every life can be viewed as worthy of treasuring. Whether that moment is filled with despair or joy; they provide entertaining relief and nourishing benefits. The stories are real and everyone will relate in some way.

BOOK NO. 10:  “Thirty Perfect Days” by Claudia Taller. Friday, June 26.

In her book 30 Perfect Days, Finding Abundance in Ordinary Life, a spiritual memoir, author Claudia Taller allows the reader to go into her personal world to find the perfect moments that ultimately define our lives. 30 Perfect Days, Finding Abun30 Perfect Daysdance in Ordinary Life is a quest to live in the moment, make connections, and pay attention to what life has to offer. Through daily reflection, Taller deals with life’s surface obstacles with honesty and authenticity to gain insight into the patterns behind the problems. By the end of her journey, Taller is more accepting and forgiving of herself and others and knows first-hand that a change of approach can lead any seeker to a more fulfilling and meaningful life. The reader comes to a deeper understanding that once we embrace our lives as they are and turn inward to seek guidance, stress, judgment, expectations, and disappointments become small obstacles along the way. In the end, Taller infers, it is up to us to nurture our souls.

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writersbridgebridgebuilder

Recently retired after 35 years with the News & Advance newspaper in Lynchburg, VA, now re-inventing myself as a novelist/nonfiction writer and writing coach in Lake George, NY.

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