Weather Report, March 28

Image result for australian outback images
THIS WEEK’S FEATURED BOOKS, “ECHOES OF TATTERED TONGUES,” BY JOHN GUZLOWSKI, ”FIXING BOO BOO,” BY PAT STANFORD AND ”MAZE,” BY KATYA MILLS, MAY BE FOUND BY SCROLLING DOWN BELOW THIS POST, OR BY CLICKING ON THE AUTHOR’S NAME ON OUR AUTHOR’S PAGE.
,I have to admit having a soft spot for the Southern Yellow Pines Publishing Company in Tallahassee, FLA. SYYP (I don’t like acronyms, but sometimes it’s necessary) has sent a flock of authors to Snowflakes in a Blizzard, and I have been impressed with the effort publisher Terri Gerrell puts in to get her writers noticed.
It probably helps that this is very much a regional operation, specializing in Florida authors and/or books, and that enables Gerrell to dispatch “her” writers to book signings within a relatively small geographical area.
I mention all this not so much to give SYYP a plug (I definitely don’t want to start down that road),  but to encourage other publishers to take advantage of this service. Snowflakes in a Blizzard has no intention of competing with or co-opting the efforts of any publisher, agent or publicist. It’s just another way of getting books noticed — and because the service is free, we have no financial incentive for competing with anyone.
Mark W. Adams, whose “OUTBACK: Bothers and Sinisters” is featured on Snowflakes this week, has recently combined his young adult/kids company to SYYP.   We haven’t done many young adult books, but this one is intriguing, offering a taste of life and language in the Australian Outback.
Also featured this week are “Descriptions of Heaven,” by Randal Eldon Greene and “The Girl Who Could Read Hearts,” by Sherry Masonave.
Sherry already has established quite an impressive “footprint”  — her work has been featured by NBC’s Today, ABC, CBS, Fox, and NPR, USA Today, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, and Business Week.
Randal initially made a name for himself by writing short fiction. He may be our first author with combined degrees in English and anthropology.
UPCOMING ON SNOWFLAKES IN A BLIZZARD, MARCH 29-APRIL 3
“OUTBACK: BOTHERS AND SINISTERS,” BY MARK W. ADAMS.

The Family Tree Novel series’ steady, enduring story is like a tree growing against nature’s will toward the sky. Driew Qweepie’s perennial story buds, blossoms, grows, and falls from the twisted branches of the Qweepie family tree. The story’s sing-song rhythm creates a songline for readers to follow, scanning a century all told.

The book begins with a boy starting walkabout, a historical rite of passage into manhood. The moments throughout walkabout are viewed by a magic man chasing along an untimely move from Dawson City, Victoria, Australia’s Outback, to Dawson Springs in rural western Kentucky. This journey becomes a boy’s tracing of his bloodline, discovery of country, and possible death.

 

“THE GIRL WHO COULD READ HEARTS,” BY SHERRY MASONAVE.

Born gifted with a rare seventh sense—the ability to read human hearts coupled with keen intuition—protagonist Kate Kindrick struggles to understand her capabilities. She is often bewildered by her unique perceptions, combined with seeing symbols and colors in people’s hearts. Kate’s parents fear that their young daughter suffers from delusional psychosis. Their concerns are intensified by her claims that she has conversations with an angel. Yet it’s her naiveté of the intuitive signs that augur trouble.

“DESCRIPTIONS OF HEAVEN,” BY RANDAL ELDON GREENE.

A linguist, a lake monster, and the looming shadow of death—news of an unknown creature in the New Bedford Lake coincides with news that Natalia’s cancer has returned.

On the shores of the lake in a strange house with many secret doors, Robert and his family must face the fact that Natalia is dying, and there is no hope this time. But they continue on; their son plays by the lakeside, Natalia paints, Robert writes, and all the while the air is thick with dust from a worldwide drought that threatens to come down and coat their little corner of green.

A lament for what is already lost and what is yet to be lost, Descriptions of Heaven leaves only one question to be asked: What’s next?

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writersbridgebridgebuilder

Recently retired after 35 years with the News & Advance newspaper in Lynchburg, VA, now re-inventing myself as a novelist/nonfiction writer and writing coach in Lake George, NY.

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