First Tuesday Replay, Nov. 7

THIS FEATURE HAS A TWO-FOLD PURPOSE: 1. TO ALLOW THOSE RECENTLY ADDED TO OUR FOLLOWER’S LIST TO LEARN ABOUT BOOKS THEY MIGHT HAVE MISSED AND 2. TO MAKE SURE PREVIOUSLY FEATURED AUTHORS AND THEIR WORK AREN’T FORGOTTEN. IF YOU’D LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT ANY ONE OF THE BOOKS REVISITED HERE, SIMPLY CLICK ON THE “AUTHOR” PAGE, THEN ON THAT AUTHOR’S NAME.

“THE SILENCED,” BY JAMES DeVITA

In the aftermath of the Millenium War, the new Zero Tolerance government focuses on the safety inherent in homogeneity of political thinking, ethnic origin, and appearance. A wall has been constructed around the southern part of the country and suspected families relocated into a “re-dap” community in which the young people can be educated into right-thinking. But within her Youth Training Facility, Marina has found some kindred souls: an art teacher who encourages her, a boyfriend with whom she sneaks out at night, and a rebellious newcomer. As she gradually retrieves her memories of her mother’s death, Marina determines to honor her spirit, starting her own resistance movement, the White Rose. This leads to a horrifying discovery: the tool the party uses to silence wrong-thinkers permanently.

“A RED, RED ROSE,” BY SUSAN CORYELL.

When twenty-year-old Ashby Overton travels to Overhome Estate in Southern Virginia for the summer, she hopes to unearth her ancestral roots and the cause of a mysterious family rift surrounding the horseback riding death of her Grandmother Lenore many years ago.

From the moment she enters her room in the oldest wing, Ashby feels an invisible, enfolding presence. She learns the room belonged to a woman named Rosabelle, but no one is willing to talk about Rosabelle—no one except Luke, the stable boy who captures her heart. As Ashby and Luke become closer, she realizes he can be the confidant she needs to share the terrifying, unfolding secrets.

Ever present is a force Ashby never sees, only feels. Candles light themselves, notes from an old lullaby fall from the ceiling, the radio tunes itself each day. And roses, always meant for Ashby, appear in the unlikeliest places. Are the roses a symbol of love, or do they represent something dark, something deep and evil?

“ADIRONDACK GOLD,” BY PERSIS GRANGER.

Hollis Ingraham, a young Adirondack boy of the 1890s is forced by his widowed mother’s poverty to go to live on the farm of grandparents he hardly knows, and who, he senses, do not like his mother. He strives to earn the approval of his seemingly angry grandfather by mastering chores on the farm, and, in the process, learns more about his deceased father and the cause of his grandfather’s bitterness.

In the 1970s and ‘80s, my husband and I were subsistence farming on an old farm in the so”uthern Adirondacks, heating mostly with wood, growing large gardens and raising pigs, cows and chickens for family food. I thought about how much work it was for us even though using modern equipment, and marveled that farmers in the 19th century had done it.  My admiration grew for those humble farm families of the past, and I wanted to share that proud history with youth of today whose roots reach deep into that tradition. I wanted them to understand the responsibility assumed by children early Adirondack family farms and to be proud of their heritage.”

“FRATERNITY OF FRACTURES, BY MARK PANNEBECKER.

Phoenix and Justin Sunder are master cat burglars and best friends until Dylan Panicosky enters their circle of hedonism and crime. Set in the blighted city of St. Louis in the ’80s, Fraternity of Fractures is a love triangle played out in an urban setting full of nocturnal decadence and danger, with all the players fractured in their own way.

“FALLEN,” BY MELINDA INMAN

From Melinda: “I spent twenty years researching the biblical and the mythological stories surrounding the Garden of Eden. My own curiosity inspired my research.  First, I examined the ancient Hebrew record. I was then delighted to find many similarities to the biblical version in myth, each with their own twist, depending on the culture. This common story spanned cultures. But I was disturbed to see misogynistic ideas arise within myth across all cultures. Spending so much time mulling over the implications of our human roots, the novel took shape in my mind, and I began to write in 2008.”

 

“SWINGING ON THE GARDEN GATE,” BY ELIZABETH JARRETT ANDREW.

Andrew skillfully and seamlessly weaves the threads of spirituality, sexuality and the creative process out of the compelling events of her life. The spark of spirit she finds embedded in her body she also discovers throughout the solid matter of life — in childhood, in nature, in encounters with death and loss and wild growth. Her exploration of the sacred is vivid, fresh, and grounded in the details of ordinary days.:

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writersbridgebridgebuilder

Recently retired after 35 years with the News & Advance newspaper in Lynchburg, VA, now re-inventing myself as a novelist/nonfiction writer and writing coach in Lake George, NY.

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