I Know You Love Me, Too

This week’s other featured books, “Mouse,” by N. Scott Stedman and “Preternatural: Reckoning,” by Peter Topside, can be found by scrolling down below this post, or by clicking the author’s name on our Authors page.

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THE BOOK: I Know You Love Me, Too

PUBLISHED IN: 2021

THE AUTHOR: Amy Neswald

THE PUBLISHER: New American Press

SUMMARY: I Know You Love Me, Too circles around two half-sisters, Ingrid and Kate, eight years apart, whose shared father dies when Ingrid is twenty and Kate, twelve. As Ingrid struggles with her artistic identity and love life, the hairline cracks in Kate’s seemingly perfect life widen. Told from varying perspectives, I Know You Love Me, Too follows Ingrid and Kate through their lives, loves, and their attempts to understand their inheritance of mysteries and memories left behind by their dead father. As Ingrid muses in Friday Harbor, the relationship between half-sisters should be half as complicated… but they’re not.

The novel-in-stories about sisterhood, grief, and discovering one’s true self through the accidents of life.

THE BACK STORY: This book started as a single story about two half-sisters on a kayak trip who are vying for the attention of their tour guide, who become proxy to their attempts to ‘own’ the memory of their shared, deceased father. Then, someone I deeply respect suggested I read Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strouth and that was it – I started investing into the world of these two characters.

WHY THIS TITLE: In the collection, the characters live in families that don’t say “I love you,” but one character says at some point the she knows her older sister loves her, despite her awkwardness and unwillingness to admit her love.

WHY SOMEONE WOULD WANT TO READ IT: I Know You Love Me, Too, is an examination of sisterhood and grief and the secrets left behind when a parent dies too young. This is a hopeful novel-in-stories that celebrates the subtleties of beauty.

REVIEW COMMENTS:

“The language is compelling, both in terms of its descriptions and its apt observations. In “Forty-six”, repetition and figurative language engine the story, showing the near mania that drives Kate. In another story, a character remarks, ‘Love is like that: it is hard to get the measurements just right.’

“The novel-in-stories I Know You Love Me, Too follows the evolution of a sisterhood—a troubled relationship covered via visceral descriptions and lush language.” — — Camille-Yvette Welsch, Foreword Reviews

“Enhanced with inventive observations – success ‘arrived too late and she doesn’t know how to care for it’; ‘Ingrid channels her obese aunt, her succulent swirls of fat’; ‘she’s run out of things to say. She blames this on contentment’ – Neswald effortlessly alchemizes the prosaic into something extraordinary.” — Terry Hong, Shelf Awareness

AUTHOR PROFILE: Amy Neswald is a fiction writer and screenwriter. Her work has appeared in The Rumpus, The Normal School, Bat City Review, and Green Mountain Review, among others. She is a recent recipient of the New American Fiction prize with her debut novel-in-stories I Know You Love Me, Too. Prior to moving to rural Maine, she had a long career as a wigmaster for Broadway shows. She teaches creative writing at the University of Maine in Farmington and continues working on her next novel and a collection of short films.

AUTHOR COMMENTS:

Keep writing.

LOCAL OUTLETS: Devany, Doak, and Garrett Booksellers

WHERE TO BUY IT:

Bookshop.org

Amazon

And other online vendors and independent bookstores

PRICE: $17

CONTACT THE AUTHOR:

https://www.amyneswald.com/

https://www.instagram.com/amyneswald/

Published by

bridgetowriters

Recently retired after 35 years with the News & Advance newspaper in Lynchburg, VA, now re-inventing myself as a novelist/nonfiction writer and writing coach in Lake George, NY.

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