Weather Report, Jan. 7

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(Photo from Baltana)

Our currently featured books, “Are You Famous?,” by Ken Waldman and “Two Natures,” by Jendi Reiter, can be found by scrolling down below this post, along with the First Tuesday Replay. Or, just click the author’s name on our author’s page.


UPCOMING ON SNOWFLAKES IN A BLIZZARD, JAN. 8-14.

“THE ART OF HEALING,” BY CHARLES AND GAIL ENTREKIN.

Many books have been written by cancer survivors, many others by their family members or caregivers. But this account of Charles Entrekin’s life-or-death struggle with leukemia is different, because it looks at the story from two perspectives — his, and that of his wife Gail. Moreover, it does so with poetry.

Says Charles: “This book documents a transformative and cathartic experience in my life, and it is a natural follow-up to my previous collection of poems, PORTRAIT OF A ROMANCE, a love story to my wife. THE ART OF HEALING also tells a story—a story of discovery and fear, healing, forgiveness, compassion and love.

“Gail and I had experienced what we called a shared reality for 35 years, but approached my diagnosis of cancer, of necessity, from separate points of view. It became obvious that we were going to have to go through this experience as separate people. We began looking into Buddhist philosophy and thought. As I began facing the possibility of not surviving this experience, I found myself trying come to grips with what my life story was all about. The more I delved into Buddhism, the more I began to appreciate a perspective that questioned my belief and attachment to the story of who I thought I was.

“After spending some time doing this, I tried to explain to my brother on the telephone one day what about Buddhism interested me and I failed to come up with a good answer. So I set about devising what I call my ‘elevator speech,’ a way of explaining — in a limited amount of time–what attracted me to Buddhism. The short version is as follows: Buddhism gave me a way to let go of my attachment to the self I used to believe in.”

“3 WOMEN, 4 TOWNS, 5 BODIES,” BY TOWNSEND WALKER.

These sixteen stories are rooted in foreign places, cemeteries, violence, and strong women. The worlds the characters construct are unforgiving. Their paths cross in tangled and sometimes unfortunate ways. In the title novella, five linked stories, three women use wit, seduction, and weapons to master the men they meet. The ribald reverend in “The Second Coming” meets his match in nineteen-year-old Charity. In “Super Secrets,” two women are neighbors and lovers, until one is betrayed and exacts revenge. On a darker note, a crazed horse and a storm at sea shatter a fragile love in “Slashing at the Nets.” Then, in “Storm Painter,” an artist moves in with a writer, but their past destroys his third novel. Place is important. No one other than an Italian detective would find a clue in a singular tortellino. The New York sniper would only be trained by the Israeli Defense Force. This short story collection spans centuries where nothing is as it seems, and twists are as abundant as they are deadly.

“BREAKFAST WITH NERUDA,” BY LAURA MOE

Eighteen year old Michael Flynn chooses to live in his 1982 Ford LTD station wagon, The Blue Whale, rather than his mother’s home. Her hoarding has made the house unlivable. Then Michael commits a crime and is sentenced to community service, where he meets chain-smoking Shelly Miller, who is also cleaning the high school over the summer. What should have been tedious leads to a journey to self-discovery.

Michael begins to fall for Shelly, but isn’t ready to open up to her. Shelly, in turn, isn’t quick to reveal much about herself either. However, it’s a shared love of words and Pablo Neruda’s poetry that brings them closer. Slowly, Michael begins to entrust Shelly with the parts of himself he felt necessary to hide, including the fact he’s never met his father. His honesty eventually coaxes Shelly into revealing her own troubled past. The two forge a bond, and Shelly helps Michael uncover the buried secrets that reveal his identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are You Famous?

This week’s other featured book, “Two Natures,” by Jendi Reiter, can be found by scrolling down below this post, along with the First Tuesday Replay. Or, click the author’s name on our Authors page.

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THE BOOK: Are You Famous?

PUBLISHED IN: 2008.

THE AUTHOR: Ken Waldman.

THE EDITOR:  J. L. Powers.

THE PUBLISHER:  Catalyst Book Press (so you know, this was the first book the publisher did; the publisher went on to release several more books, took a hiatus, then returned with a much different focus).

SUMMARY: Ken Waldman moved to Alaska in 1985 to attend an MFA program in Fairbanks, Alaska, where he graduated in 1988, an emphasis in fiction writing. Four years later, spring 1992, working as a tenure-track assistant professor in the rural community of Nome, Waldman fell ill with a mysterious ailment characterized by debilitating joint pains. He was 36 years old. For most of the next three years, he couldn’t type, couldn’t play music, and sometimes had trouble even walking. He had to resign from his job as he sought healers from New York City to Seattle. When he at last regained his health, he started combining his talents in writing, music, and teaching, and began working as Alaska’s Fiddling Poet.

This is a memoir of how he came to grow into that career, and what it took to sustain it.

Image result for Ken Waldman + poet + photos

THE BACK STORY: Ken Waldman has been a full-time touring musician and writer since 1995. Written in 2005 (except for a December 2007 postscript), and published in 2008, this memoir is also a handbook on how someone can become a troubadour and then how to make a living at this most arcane of professions. The subtitle is an apt description: Touring America with Alaska’s Fiddling Poet.

WHY THIS TITLE: Ken Waldman works in lots of settings. At schools, his sessions are often interactive and include a question-and-answer session. His general shows often include a time for questions. He’s been asked, “Are you famous?” by elementary school students, by senior center residents, and by folks of every age group in between.

WHY SOMEONE WOULD WANT TO READ IT: Why read any (good) memoir? It’s an exploration of the human condition.

In this case, too, there’s practical information for anyone wanting to learn what it takes to make a living as a practicing artist.

Also, because the author is an experienced, much-published writer, a reader can be confident that she or he will be in good hands.

REVIEW COMMENTS:

“Highly recommended for personal, academic, and community library collections, Are You Famous? is an honest and candid perspective on the music business from the inside.” —Midwest Book Review

Are You Famous? is the ultimate DIY guide and inspirational text.” —Tucson Weekly

Are You Famous? is the story of a man who is anything but famous (in the traditional sense), but whose generous artistic spirit makes him a compelling and memorable figure.” —Times of Acadiana.

Are You Famous? is a book about making music and poems, about America, but finally, is a book about hope. . . . I really loved the book.” —Al Maginnes, music critic and poet

“Ken’s story is . . . all our stories, collected and distilled by a roving poet/musician possessed of a clear eye and a big heart. Waldman is clearly in the tradition of Walt Whitman, Woody Guthrie, John Steinbeck, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Ken Kesey.” —Jim Clark, Jordan Professor of Southern Literature and Writer-in-Residence, Barton University, Wilson NC

AUTHOR PROFILE:  Ken Waldman is a writer with 11 books (9 full-length poetry collections, a memoir, and a kids’ book), and a fiddler with 9 CDs (including 2 for kids). On stage, he combines Appalachian-style string-band music, original poetry, and (mostly) Alaska-set storytelling for a performance uniquely his. www.kenwaldman.com for more information.

AUTHOR COMMENTS: One early reviewer asked why anyone would go to the trouble to live such a life. Ken Waldman’s response was to put together a CD, titled Some Favorites, to go with the book.

SAMPLE CHAPTER: (Provide link).

https://www.kenwaldman.com/excerpt-from-are-you-famous

LOCAL OUTLETS: I always have copies–or can get more from the publisher. It looks like Amazon has copies. My contact information is below.

WHERE ELSE TO BUY IT: In theory any bookstore ought to be able to get their hands on a copy. Or else contact Ken Waldman directly. The publisher might have copies available also.

PRICE: $15.00.

CONTACT THE AUTHOR: www.kenwaldman.com, www.trumpsonnets.com, ken@kenwaldman.com

 

 

Two Natures

THE BOOK: Two Natures

PUBLISHED IN: 2016,

THE AUTHOR: Jendi Reiter.

THE EDITOR: Ellen LaFleche (https://winningwriters.com/people/ellen-lafleche) and John Ollom (http://ollomart.com/) were my indispensable beta-readers. Don Mitchell and Ruth Thompson of Saddle Road Press worked with me on final edits and book design.

THE PUBLISHER: Saddle Road Press. http://saddleroadpress.com/

Two Natures by [Reiter, Jendi]SUMMARY: Two Natures is the coming-of-age story of Julian Selkirk, a fashion photographer in New York City in the early 1990s. His faith in Jesus helped him survive his childhood in the Atlanta suburbs with an abusive alcoholic father, but the church’s condemnation of his sexual orientation has left him alienated and ashamed. Yearning for new ideals to anchor him after his loss of faith, Julian seeks his identity through love affairs with three very different men: tough but childish Phil Shanahan, a personal trainer who takes a dangerous shortcut to success; enigmatic, cosmopolitan Richard Molineux, the fashion magazine editor who gives him his first big break; and Peter Edelman, an earnest left-wing activist with a secret life. Amid the devastation of the AIDS epidemic and the racial tensions of New York politics, Julian learns to see beyond surface attractions and short-term desires, and to use his art to serve his community.

THE BACK STORY:  The book’s theme arose from the ongoing conflict in contemporary Christianity over equality for LGBTQ people. I was active for many years in the Episcopal Church, which has been at the forefront of this debate since they ordained an openly gay bishop, Gene Robinson, in 2004. The issue tore apart some of my Christian friendships and prayer circles, including the writing group where I was working on the earliest drafts of this novel.

I was raised by two mothers in New York City in the 1970s-80s. Because of work and personal problems, they had to remain closeted, so we were cut off from gay culture during a pivotal era of community-building, activism, and artistic expression. Writing about gay New York is a way for me to connect with that history now and imaginatively live the alternate life I wished for.

WHY THIS TITLE:  “Two Natures” refers to the dual nature of Jesus as both fully divine and fully human—the miraculous paradox at the heart of traditional Christian belief. It’s a symbol for Julian’s struggle to integrate the sacred and the erotic, which his bigoted religious background has split apart. As the book developed, the title also turned out to describe the practical problem of an “opposites attract” love affair. Julian and Peter face the challenge of letting their differences complement and educate one another, instead of driving them apart. This journey continues in my current novel-in-progress, Origin Story, told from Peter’s perspective.

WHY SOMEONE WOULD WANT TO READ IT: Julian says: “Hot guys, fabulous clothes, and very irreverent jokes!”

Peter says: “To learn empathy for a marginalized community and join us in our struggle for justice!”

REVIEW COMMENTS:

“Southern boy Julian Selkirk brings an outsider’s wry and engaging sense of humor to his quest to make it in the New York City fashion world. His romp through gay men’s urban culture also holds suffering, grief, pathos, and an ongoing struggle with the God of his childhood, as he comes of age during the height of the AIDS crisis. Though he gets distracted along the way—with politicians, preachers, drag queens, activists, Ironman gym buddies and sex, lots of sex—he never stops looking for real love to redeem him. An entertaining novel and a pleasure to read.” —Toby Johnson, author of Gay Spirituality and the novels Secret Matter and The Fourth Quill

“If you want to know what life is like in Nineties New York, when Style has become God, sex has become a contact sport, and jobs, money, and survival are always around the corner someplace else, then this late coming-of-age novel is a good place to start.” —Perry Brass, author of the Amazon bestseller The Manly Art of Seduction; The Manly Pursuit of Desire and Love; and the Ferro-Grumley finalist novel King of Angels

“It’s rare to discover within a gay love story an equally-powerful undercurrent of political and spiritual examination. Too many gay novels focus on evolving sexuality or love and skim over underlying religious values systems; but one of the special attributes of Two Natures isn’t just its focus on duality, but its intense revelations about what it means to be both Christian and gay.” — Diane Donovan, Midwest Book Review

AUTHOR PROFILE:  Jendi Reiter’s writing is guided by their belief that people take precedence over ideologies. In exploring themes of queer family life, spiritual integration, and healing from adverse childhood experiences, their goal is to create understanding that leads to social change.

Reiter is the author of the novel Two Natures (Saddle Road Press, 2016), the short story collection An Incomplete List of My Wishes (Sunshot Press, 2018), and four poetry books and chapbooks, most recently Bullies in Love (Little Red Tree, 2015). Their awards include a Massachusetts Cultural Council Fellowship for Poetry, the New Letters Prize for Fiction, the Wag’s Revue Poetry Prize, the Bayou Magazine Editor’s Prize in Fiction, and two awards from the Poetry Society of America. Two Natures won the Rainbow Award for Best Gay Contemporary Fiction and was a finalist for the Book Excellence Awards and the Lascaux Prize for Fiction. Reiter is the editor of WinningWriters.com, an online resource site with contests and markets for creative writers. For literary news, readings, and reviews, visit JendiReiter.com and follow @JendiReiter on Twitter.

AUTHOR COMMENTS: Having been assigned female gender at birth, I was surprised that it felt so natural to write “autobiography” from a male perspective. In the first few years, I struggled with imposter syndrome, and had to rethink what really makes a voice masculine or feminine. Though there are differences in how men and women may approach intimacy, broadly speaking, this is complicated by internalized sexism/homophobia, which pressures men of all orientations to seem tough and independent when deep down they need loving connection. My characters became more relatable when I let them show the vulnerabilities that at first I was afraid would expose me as not a real man.

This new introspection about gender, coupled with my discovery of diverse identity labels as I did research in LGBTQ communities, made me realize that I’m actually not female but nonbinary/transmasculine! Life imitates art…or something.

SAMPLE CHAPTER:

Scroll down past the blurbs for an excerpt:

https://winningwriters.com/meta-nav/our-sponsors/two-natures-by-jendi-reiter

LOCAL OUTLETS:

Broadside Bookshop, 247 Main Street, Northampton, MA 01060.

https://www.broadsidebooks.com/

Bureau of General Studies-Queer Division

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Center

208 W. 13th Street, Room 210

NYC, NY 10011

http://bgsqd.com/

WHERE ELSE TO BUY IT:

Amazon

PRICE: $4.99 Kindle, $22 paperback

CONTACT THE AUTHOR: jendi@winningwriters.com

First Tuesday Replay, Jan. 1

This feature has a two-fold purpose: 1. To allow those recently added to our followers list to discover books they might have missed and 2. To make sure previously featured authors and their work aren’t forgotten. If you’d like to learn more about any of the books revisited here, simply click on the “Author” page, then on that author’s name.

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“THE COLOR OF HOME,” BY RICH MARCELLO

Can two people stay connected for a lifetime and each know the complete truth about the other? When New Yorker Nick Satterborn falls in love with Sassa Vikander, he’s convinced the answer is yes.

Nick Satterborn. Songwriter. Dabbler on the spiritual path. Survivor.

Sassa Vikander. Stunning chef. Seeker on the path of most resistance. Survivor.

Contentment percolates for a time, until the two are hurtled into a life of uncertainty, self-evaluation, and growth. Each dreams heroic dreams of overcoming his/her past, rising out of sadness, rediscovering home, finding peace. Their worlds dissolve and reform. People and events threaten to tear them apart.

The Color of Home is a story of love, of loss, of digging deep down to the bottom of things until maybe, just maybe, Nick and Sassa find the strength to become whole. Their journey offers a unique, honest glimpse into the life and love of a palpably rare relationship of our time.


“COMPLICATED BLUE,” BY P.J. WHITTLESEA

“I decided to write a different witch book and flip the whole genre on its head. I purposely steered away from the medieval viewpoint of witches. So, there are no broomsticks, magic wands or pointy hats. I also wanted to write about a good witch instead of the traditional ‘evil’ one.

“In ancient cultures witches, shamans and others weren’t considered bad, they were the only ones who could communicate with the dead. The story follows, not only a witch as she comes of age, but her primary task which involves saving the souls of the dead.”


Leda Meredith

“BALLET, BOTANY AND A DINNER FROM SCRATCH,” BY LEDA MEREDITH.

This is a memoir about the life of a professional dancer turned botanist and food writer. It has a strong focus on the sustainable food movement and how our food choices impact not only our health and the environment, but also our emotional and cultural well being. This new edition has more recipes than the original did, and also offers insights into how the local organic food movement has grown since the book first came out — and how far it still has to go. Plus, there are some personal updates: When I wrote the book I devoted a chapter of it to a man I’d had an affair with twenty years earlier. I had no idea at that time that I would ever see him again. He read the book, tracked me down, and now we’re married.


“METAMORPHOSIS,” BY ISABELLA MacLEOD

“I decided to write this story to bring awareness to the very real and absolutely horrifying as well as extremely debilitating illness of “Morgellons”. At present the CDC is labeling this illness as a psychiatric condition called “Delusional Parasitosis,” where people believe that they are infested with bugs, worms and parasites. These patients are also experiencing sores which do not heal up very easily and when they do,they typically leave permanent scars. This is very traumatizing, particularly when there is facial involvement.”


“MURDER IN THE GENERATIVE KITCHEN,” BY MEG PONTECORVO.

Murder in the Generative Kitchen intertwines parallel plots: the Chicago murder trial of McConnery Ellis, a wealthy middle aged woman accused of poisoning her husband with a gourmet meal prepared with the help of her AI “smart kitchen”; and the efforts of juror Julio Gonzalez to hook up with Iris, a beautiful fellow juror, at the Acapulco resort where they have been sent to watch trial footage.

The futuristic trial system, “Vacation Jury Duty,” enables the lucky jurors to stream daily testimony through sleek headsets as they enjoy the amenities at the court-owned resort. But there’s a catch: as in jury trials today, they are forbidden to communicate with other jurors. Under constant surveillance by the resort’s security guards, Julio struggles to devise ways to catch Iris’s attention. He also becomes fascinated by the trial, in which attorney manipulated sims interrogate a lively parade of human witnesses. The plots converge when Julio returns to Chicago for deliberation and valiantly attempts to seduce Iris with his command of the facts, as the jurors clash over whether  the murderer is Mrs. Ellis, or a high tech kitchen capable of intuiting — and fulfilling — its owner’s innermost desires.

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“THE MARS RUN,” BY CHRIS GERRIB

A young woman on her first real job decides to become an astronaut, which in the late 21st century is equivalent to a truck driver or a merchant sailor, i.e., a tough working-person’s job. After she’s involved in a fatal accident in training, she gets a posting on a small ship going to Mars. Halfway there, the ship gets hijacked by pirates, damaged, and she is the sole survivor of the original crew. She offers to help repair the ship in exchange for her life. The story then becomes one of her trying to escape the pirates.

 

 

Weather Report, Dec. 31

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(Photo from Retail Gazette).

Our currently featured books, “What Luck, Life,” by Kathryn Schwille, “Reading T.S. Eliot to a Bird,” by David Chorlton, “Why We Make Gardens,” by Jeanne Larsen and “Retrograde,” by Kat Hausler, can be found by scrolling down below this post, or by clicking the author’s name on our Authors page.

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Happy New Year!

This week, Snowflakes in a Blizzard (snowflakesarise.wordpress.com) is all about intersections.

Jendi Reiter’s novel “Two Natures” sits at the nexus of sexual identity and religion. Ken Waldman’s memoir, “Are You Famous?” comes to us from the meeting point of music and poetry. Both raise important cultural questions.

Writes Jendi: “‘Two Natures’ refers to the dual nature of Jesus as both fully divine and fully human—the miraculous paradox at the heart of traditional Christian belief. It’s a symbol for Julian’s struggle to integrate the sacred and the erotic, which his bigoted religious background has split apart. As the book developed, the title also turned out to describe the practical problem of an ‘opposites attract’ love affair. Julian and Peter face the challenge of letting their differences complement and educate one another, instead of driving them apart.

Ken Waldman, meanwhile, has been a full-time touring musician and writer since 1995. Written in 2005 (except for a December 2007 postscript), and published in 2008, this memoir is also a handbook on how someone can become a troubadour and then how to make a living at this most arcane of professions. The subtitle is an apt description: Touring America with Alaska’s Fiddling Poet.

UPCOMING ON SNOWFLAKES IN A BLIZZARD, JANUARY 1-7.

“TWO NATURES,” BY JENDI REITER

“The book’s theme arose from the ongoing conflict in contemporary Christianity over equality for LGBTQ people. I was active for many years in the Episcopal Church, which has been at the forefront of this debate since they ordained an openly gay bishop, Gene Robinson, in 2004. The issue tore apart some of my Christian friendships and prayer circles, including the writing group where I was working on the earliest drafts of this novel.”

“ARE YOU FAMOUS?” BY KEN WALDMAN.

Ken Waldman moved to Alaska in 1985 to attend an MFA program in Fairbanks, Alaska, where he graduated in 1988, an emphasis in fiction writing. Four years later, spring 1992, working as a tenure-track assistant professor in the rural community of Nome, Waldman fell ill with a mysterious ailment characterized by debilitating joint pains. He was 36 years old. For most of the next three years, he couldn’t type, couldn’t play music, and sometimes had trouble even walking. He had to resign from his job as he sought healers from New York City to Seattle. When he at last regained his health, he started combining his talents in writing, music, and teaching, and began working as Alaska’s Fiddling Poet.

This is a memoir of how he came to grow into that career, and what it took to sustain it.

FIRST TUESDAY REPLAY

This month, we will revisit “The Color of Home,” by Rich Marcello, “Murder in the Generative Kitchen,” by Meg Pontecorvo, “Metamorphosis,” by Isabella MacLeod, “The Mars Run,” by Chris Gerrib, “Botany, Ballet and a Dinner From Scratch,” by Leda Meredith and “Complicated Blue,” by P.J. Whittlesea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weather Report, December 24

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(Photo from all-free-download.com)

Our currently featured books, “What Luck, Life,” by Kathryn Schwille, “Reading T.S. Eliot to a Bird,” by David Chorlton, “Why We Make Gardens,” by Jeanne Larsen and “Retrograde,” by Kat Hausler, can be found by scrolling down below this post, or by clicking the author’s name on our Authors page.

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As I may have mentioned before, Snowflakes in a Blizzard won’t be highlighting any new books this week. It just wouldn’t be fair to those authors, given all the holiday distractions.

Snowflakes will resume on Jan. 1, and will continue to expose you to unique work from writers you may not have “met.” Thanks so much for supporting this project in 2018.

Merry Christmas!

 

 

What Luck, This Life

What Luck, This Life by [Schwille, Kathryn]This week’s other featured books, “Reading T.S. Eliot to a Bird,” by David Chorlton, “Why We Make Gardens,” by Jeanne Larsen and “Retrograde,” by Kat Hausler, can be found by scrolling down below this post, or by clicking the author’s name on our authors page.


THE BOOK: What Luck, This Life

PUBLISHED IN: September 2018.

THE AUTHOR: Kathryn Schwille.

THE EDITOR: Betsy Teter.

THE PUBLISHER: Hub City Press.

SUMMARY:  What Luck, This Life begins in the aftermath of the 2003 Columbia Space Shuttle disaster, as the people of fictional Kiser, Texas watch their pastures swarm with searchers, and reporters bluster at their doors. A shop owner defends herself against a sexual predator who is pushed to new boldness after he is disinvited to his family reunion. SchwilleSized crop.jpgA closeted father facing a divorce that will leave his gifted boy adrift retrieves an astronaut’s remains. An engineer who dreams of orbiting earth joins a search for debris and instead uncovers an old neighbor’s buried longing. In a chorus of voices spanning places and years, What Luck, This Life explores the Columbia disaster’s surprising fallout for a town beset by the tensions of class, race, and missed opportunity.

THE BACK STORY: In February of 2005, two years after the Columbia shuttle disaster, I saw an Associated Press story in my local newspaper filed from a New Orleans conference of forensic scientists. Sharon Brown, a police document examiner from Israel, had delivered a talk about the unique assignment she’d undertaken. Eighteen pages from the diary of Israeli astronaut Ilan Ramon had been found on a forest floor in East Texas. The pieces of metal-bound notebook, which had survived two months in the elements, were battered and stuck together, some even wadded. Sharon Brown’s job was to separate the pages and see if there was anything for his widow to read. I was intrigued. Why hadn’t I heard about the discovery of this diary? What else was recovered that most of us hadn’t heard about? I was in the middle of another project, but this one started taking over. I couldn’t get it out of my head. A year later, I was on a plane to East Texas. I thought it would be a rich backdrop for fiction, and it was.

WHY THIS TITLE: It’s from the last chapter of the book and, like the book, evokes both trouble and joy.

WHY SOMEONE WOULD WANT TO READ IT: The Columbia shuttle fell about six weeks before the U.S. went to war with Iraq; the story of the heroic search that returned 84,000 pieces of the spacecraft to NASA has been largely overlooked.

 
REVIEW COMMENTS: 

“Schwille’s prose is vibrant. Among the wreckage, she paints an exuberant natural landscape. Each word of this slim novel is impactful. Despite the characters’ grim undertaking, the world Schwille envisions is one no reader will ever want to leave. In the end, when the sky falls over Kiser, it reminds its inhabitants about their own mortality, that death is one of life’s greatest mysteries and that it can be as fickle and unpredictable as a mechanical malfunction.” – Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“Fans of Thomas Pierce and Amy Hill Hearth will appreciate Schwille’s spare, poetic prose and her willingness to examine both the picturesque and the unsavory sides of small-town life. A deeply thought-provoking novel.” – Booklist

AUTHOR PROFILE: My short fiction has appeared in New Letters, Memorious, Crazyhorse, West Branch, Sycamore Review and other literary journals. My stories have twice received Special Mention in the Pushcart Prize anthology and I’ve had the good fortune to receive an Individual Artist Fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council and fellowships from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts and Hambidge Center for Arts and Sciences. I live in Charlotte, NC, where I’m on the regular faculty at the Charlotte Center for Literary Arts.

SAMPLE CHAPTER: For an excerpt, click on the Reading Group Guide on my website: kathrynschwille.com

LOCAL OUTLETS: https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fhubcity.org%2Fpress%2Fcatalog%2Ffiction%2Fwhat-luck-this-life%2F&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cce401070bede4c220e3e08d65ad151a0%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636796252396583473&sdata=PphixWHERXonWw8Mt7FPzPpDL33YAbVzcjoCVgUxXgU%3D&reserved=0

WHERE ELSE TO BUY IT: Park Road Books in Charlotte (parkroadbooks.com), or order it anywhere books are sold.

PRICE: $24.95.

CONTACT THE AUTHOR: Through the contact page at kathrynschwille.com