Between Nowhere and Lost

Between Nowhere & Lost by [Christle, Alexandra]THIS WEEK’S TWO OTHER FEATURED BOOKS, “GRACE PERIOD,” BY MELINDA WORTH POPHAM AND “TEXAS ROZE,” BY IRIS SWEETWATER, CAN BE FOUND BY SCROLLING DOWN BELOW THIS POST OR BY CLICKING THE AUTHOR’S NAME ON OUR AUTHOR PAGE.
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THE BOOK: Between Nowhere and Lost

PUBLISHED IN
: 2017.


THE AUTHOR:
  Alexandra Christle

THE PUBLISHER: Deeds Publishing

SUMMARYWhen 1960s housewife Helen Hodges chances to meet textile mill owner David Drummond in her small South Carolina town, her repressed longing for a child is reawakened and discontent floods her life. As union and racial tensions in the town escalate, Helen is torn between her Catholic faith, her duty to her husband, and her growing desire to be with David. Overrun with guilt, Helen forsakes her lover and chooses to remain with her husband, until she learns some life-changing news and rushes to tell David before he leaves town, and her life…forever.

Alexandra ChristleTHE BACK STORY
: While I was searching through jobs for my hero, I came across some Supreme Court briefs on Darlington Manufacturing, a textile mill in South Carolina. The case spiked my interest, and eventually I made several trips to the Historical Commission in Darlington, SC to research the background of the plant. In 1956, the mill workers voted to join the TWUA (Textile Workers Union). In retaliation, the plant’s owner, Roger Milliken, shut down the plant, forcing over 500 people to lose their jobs. I found the story touching and heartbreaking. I hope, even though my version is fiction, to keep the memory of those who worked there alive.

WHY THIS TITLE?: I overheard a friend at a party say a place was “between nowhere and lost” and thought it would make a great title for a book.

WHY WOULD SOMEONE WANT TO READ IT? 
This story is inspired by a true event from the 1950s in Darlington, SC. Although I set the novel in a fictional town in the 1960s, anyone with an interest in the south and lifestyle of that era can enjoy the book.

REVIEW COMMENTS
Through the eyes of Helen Hodges, the real life stakes of the sweeping social changes of the 1960s come to life. Helen struggles with her faith, fertility, morality, gender, and the way of life she’d always known and sometimes found distasteful. I was really impressed by the way the author wove together union busting, north-south tension, race, and housewife ennui.


This story is peppered with deep emotions and realistic nostalgia that totally drew me in.

A relatable story that kept me on the edge of my seat while also challenging my internal conflict as to what was right and wrong.

AUTHOR PROFIL
E: Born in New York City, Alexandra was transplanted to a small town in South Carolina at the age of 11, after the death of her father. Embracing the south took some adjustments for a Yankee child, but now a resident of Norfolk, Virginia, she loves and claims the south as her home.

With a degree from the University of Missouri Journalism School, her career has spanned newspaper advertising, teaching high school English, and working as a graphic designer for a commercial print shop. But writing fiction is her passion–she started her first “novel” at age 7 and made it through two chapters before abandoning it for Barbie and Ken. And when most young girls dreamed of being Miss America, Alexandra’s dream was to appear on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, talking about her latest novel.

AUTHOR COMMENTS: I lived in a small South Carolina town in the mid-1960s, and I drew on that experience to write this story. I’m old enough to recall the racial tensions, separate public areas, and the young black boy who was one of only two Negroes in the school when I was in 7th grade there.

SAMPLE CHAPTER: Available on Amazon for Kindle.

LOCAL OUTLETS

WHERE ELSE TO BUY IT: DeedsPublishing.com , Amazon, or through my website

PRICE: $15 + S/H through deedspublishing.goodsie.com or abcnovels@gmail.com ; $19.07 on Amazon Primee-book $2.99 through Amazon

Grace Period

THE Grace Period: My Ordination to the Ordinary by [Melinda Worth Popham]BOOK: Grace Period: My Ordination to the Ordinary

PUBLISHED IN: 2017 new edition; 2015 original edition

THE AUTHOR: Melinda Worth Popham

PUBLISHER: iUniverse

SUMMARY: Grace Period recounts the spiritual journey launched by the break-up of the author’s marriage and her teenage daughter’s descent into an intractable depression that led her to an Ivy League seminary and to the discovery that pain is the Miracle Gro of spiritual growth.

THE BACK STORY: Writing is how I process my life. Grace Period is how I processed the barrage of painful life events that brought me to my knees and that led me, at age fifty-six, to Yale Divinity School, not in pursuit of ordination to ministry but quite simply to “my plain old ordinary sacred self.”

Melinda Worth PophamWHY THIS TITLE?: Several titles came and went over the thirteen (!) years I spent writing and rewriting it. The final title, Grace Period, came from an epiphany I had in a parking lot in New Haven when faced with a belligerent sign saying: “NO GRACE PERIOD! DON’T ASK!”

WHY SOMEONE WOULD WANT TO READ IT: This is a book that makes spirituality accessible, user-friendly, and transformative. This is the book I urgently needed but never found when my fifteen-year-old daughter disappeared into the sinkhole of an intractable depression. A parent living through the anguish and anxiety of an adolescent child’s suicidal depression will glom onto Grace Period for solace and insight.

REVIEW COMMENTS:

“Anyone who has suffered, or lives with a modicum of spiritual curiosity, will want to press this book into the hands of a friend.” —BlueInk Review (starred review)

“In this impeccably written memoir, Popham … proves herself a highbrow, refined spiritual sister to Anne Lamott.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“A stunning spiritual autobiography and a work of profound discernment.” —Foreward Clarion Review (5-star review)

2016 Next Generation Indie Book Awards finalist

Featured in Publisher’s Weekly’s “Meet the Indie Stars of 2016”

AUTHOR PROFILE: Melinda Worth Popham earned a BA from the University of Chicago and MAs from Yale Divinity School and Stanford. Her previous book, Skywater, was named an American Library Association Notable Book and featured in Barnes & Noble’s Discover Great New Writers. She has two adult children and lives in Los Angeles where she is a spiritual director and retreat leader. This is Popham’s third book. She is currently at work on her next.

AUTHOR COMMENTS: Transformed people transform people. I hope my memoir speaks to or, better still, sparks the reader’s own metanoia—inner change.

SAMPLE CHAPTER: See the Amazon page.

WHERE TO BUY IT: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iUniverse.

CONTACT THE AUTHOR: melinda@melindaworthpopham.com

Texas Roze

Texas Roze by [Sweetwater, Iris]THE BOOK: Texas Roze

PUBLISHED IN: 2017

THE AUTHOR: Iris Sweetwater

THE PUBLISHER: Myself.

SUMMARY: Introducing beautiful Hollywood hairstylist Roze Lawrence, who is thrust into the small-town, ranching lifestyle unexpectedly when her father passes away.

Always a privileged young woman who has everything she would ever want in life (a great job, an amazing apartment in L.A., and a hot model boyfriend), Roze Lawrence is bored. She is tired of being that girl who has it so easy. But she doesn’t expect the opportunity to find herself in the form of her father’s will; leaving her ownership of his successful ranch in small-town Texas.

Now, she will have to prove herself to the step-family she barely knows and navigate small-town life, including the sexy men that date way differently than the men back in L.A.

THE BACK STORY: Roze’s mother could not stand the country lifestyle, so when her husband would not move away to the city, they got a divorce. She took Roze with her. Roze was taken to see her father all the time until her father got remarried; her mother could not handle going anymore. Roze gets a call at work at age 23 that her father has passed away and left her half of his property to share with her step brother she hardly knows.

WHY THIS TITLE?: I knew I needed a small town where there were a lot of farms, and I found this awesome picture for the cover where the car had a Texas plate. So, that is what I chose.

WHY SOMEONE WOULD WANT TO READ IT: If they like love triangles and strong women.

REVIEW COMMENTS:

“TEXAS ROZE by Iris Sweetwater is well-written, filled with emotional pitfalls and the tension one would expect from dealing with an outsider coming to town.” – Dii at Tome Tender Book Blog

“As a native Texas I really appreciated this character. I instantly could relate to her since I live in LA now. This is a fun read that delivers a great reader experience.” Sarah

AUTHOR PROFILE: Iris Sweetwater has been a professional writer for over six years. She is a mother, published poet and author, and an educator. Iris has had a love for writing and telling stories since before she was even in school, and she always knew that some day she would publish a book, one way or the other. Her specialties are fantasy and paranormal, but after much ghostwriting, she ahs also been able to take on romance. It is her dream that she will be able to become an author full time, and she is happy to announce many projects in the works during 2017.

SAMPLE CHAPTER: Available from Kindle and Smashwords

WHERE ELSE TO BUY IT: Amazon | Smashwords | Nook

PRICE: .99 ebook 4.50 paperback

CONTACT THE AUTHOR: Website | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

Weather Report, May 22

Image result for Birthday cake + two candles + photos + free

OUR CURRENTLY FEATURED BOOKS, “WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW NOW,” BY MARCI DIEHL, “GONE TO POT,” BY JENNIFER CRAIG AND “BLACK HEARTS WHITE BONES,” BY WILLIAM FURNEY, CAN BE FOUND BY SCROLLING DOWN BELOW THIS POST, OR BY CLICKING THE AUTHOR’S NAME ON OUR AUTHOR PAGE.


 

Friday marks the second birthday of Snowflakes in a Blizzard. Maybe I’ll buy a cake.

It all started on May 26, 2015 with Brian Simpson’s novel “Island Dogs.” For awhile, we featured one book a week, then two, and now three. As of this week, we’re up to 299, and the variety has been dizzying.

We’ve done books put out by major publishing houses and (much more often) self-published by indy authors with a dream.

We’ve highlighted novels, biographies, creative non-fiction, memoirs, books of poetry, collections of short stories, and a few hybrids. If you go to the site (snowflakesarise.wordpress.com), click on the Author page and scroll through “Books by Subject,” you can see for yourself.

Some of the books have been deeply religious or spiritual. Others have been wildly irreverent. They have ranged from G to R-rated, from all facets of the political spectrum.

I value the collective credibility of this site, so I try not to inflict our followers with something that’s poorly written or difficult to understand.  On the other hand, I’m not a literary snob, and sometimes a compelling story can trump A-list writing.

What all of these books have in common, from my perspective, is that each is unique in its own way.  I shy away those that appear to have been dashed off to fit a formula, or to sound like someone else’s work — again, not to pass judgement, just to save space for work that may not fit neatly into a genre.

In a nutshell, Snowflakes in a Blizzard has a two-fold purpose: 1. To help interesting but underappreciated books get more exposure and 2. To expose our blog followers to work they might have missed.

Most of the books we feature could use a little love, which means John Grisham or J.K.Rowling probably won’t feel the need to hook up with us. In some cases, though, I’ve included books that have sold well, but are so different that I want to give our blog followers the opportunity to enjoy them.

While most of the authors have been American, we’ve also included work from Canada, Great Britain, Scotland, Ireland, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, Trinidad, India, France and Spain.

Incidentally, although this is essentially a one-person operation (and the proverbial labor of love), I refer to it as “we” because I see all the authors who have allowed me to put their work “out there” as colleagues, along with our 3,200-plus blog followers.

In most cases, I don’t know what effect these posts may have had in terms of author recognition or book sales.  It seems to me, though, that getting the opportunity to make what amounts to a one-on-pitch to over 3,000 potential readers can only be a good thing.

This week’s offerings provide an example of our diversity. “Grace Period,” by Melinda Worth Popham, is a spiritual memoir; “Between Nowhere and Lost,” by Alexandra Christl, is a novel based on a true story, Iris Sweetwater’s “Texas Roze” is just for fun.

UPCOMING ON SNOWFLAKES IN A BLIZZARD, MAY 23-29.

“GRACE PERIOD,” BY MELINDA WORTH POPHAM.

“Grace Period” recounts the spiritual journey launched by the break-up of the author’s marriage and her teenage daughter’s descent into an intractable depression that led her to an Ivy League seminary and to the discovery that pain is the Miracle Gro of spiritual growth.

“BETWEEN NOWHERE AND LOST,” BY ALEXANDRA CHRISTL

When 1960s housewife Helen Hodges chances to meet textile mill owner David Drummond in her small South Carolina town, her repressed longing for a child is reawakened and discontent floods her life. As union and racial tensions in the town escalate, Helen is torn between her Catholic faith, her duty to her husband, and her growing desire to be with David. Overrun with guilt, Helen forsakes her lover and chooses to remain with her husband, until she learns some life-changing news and rushes to tell David before he leaves town, and her life…forever.

“TEXAS ROZE,” BY IRIS SWEETWATER.

 Introducing beautiful Hollywood hairstylist, Roze Lawrence, who is thrust into the small-town, ranching lifestyle unexpectedly when her father passes away.

Always a privileged young woman who has everything she would ever want in life (a great job, an amazing apartment in L.A., and a hot model boyfriend), Roze Lawrence is bored. She is bored of being that girl who has it so easy. But she doesn’t expect the opportunity to find herself in the form of her father’s will; leaving her ownership of his successful ranch in small-town Texas.

Now, she will have to prove herself to the step-family she barely knows and navigate small-town life, including the sexy men that date way differently than the men back in L.A.

What You Don’t Know Now

What You Don't Know Now: A romantic coming of age novel. by [Diehl, Marci]THIS WEEK’S OTHER FEATURED BOOKS, “BLACK HEARTS WHITE BONES,” BY WILLIAM FURNEY AND “GONE TO POT,” BY JENNIFER CRAIG, CAN BE FOUND BY SCROLLING DOWN BELOW THIS POST, OR BY CLICKING THE AUTHOR’S NAME ON OUR AUTHOR PAGE.

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THE BOOK: What You Don’t Know Now

PUBLISHED IN: 2014

THE AUTHOR: Marci Diehl

THE EDITOR: Cynthia Kolka

THE PUBLISHER: Merge Publishing -We merge author, publisher, and everyone in between to create successful books.

SUMMARY: Bridey McKenna’s graduation present is meant to be the ultimate mother-daughter vacation, during the one of history’s most important summers — the summer of 1967. Eighteen and in Europe for the first time, nothing is what Bridey expects. Her mother wants to keep her hermetically sealed on the tour bus, safe from all harm. “Harm” in her mother’s terms means having any experiences at all.

Bridey’s chances for adventure, romance and enlightenment look slim-to-none until she arrives in Umbria and meets Alessandro — someone who could change everything about her future. Alessandro is no ordinary singing waiter and he’s the last person on earth her mother wants in her daughter’s life. Bridey’s only hope for things to get better is to connect in Rome with her worldly aunt and uncle — a man who holds a position at the British embassy in Jordan that no one ever quite… defines. When an emergency takes Bridey off the tour, on to Athens and farther into that world than she ever imagined, the complex terrain of family, love and womanhood holds a surprising itinerary. In the summer before college, it’s the education of a lifetime.

Marci DiehlSet in Germany, Italy and Greece over a six-week period, What You Don’t Know Now takes place in 1967, the famous Summer of Love, when things were not, however, loving in the US or across the world. Just a few years prior, the term “Ugly American” was born. Graffiti on Autobahn overpasses spelled out hostile feelings about the US involvement in Viet Nam. The story has an international setting as the protagonist travels, and includes the issue of falling in love with a man who is gifted and driven — and the possible consequences of that, versus the character’s own pending launch and ambitions for her life. And it explores the complex territory of love between a mother and daughter who are about to separate into their own lives for the first time.

THE BACK STORY: When I was 18, I took a similar trip in Europe and kept a travel journal. Turning 18 is a threshold for girls – a step into early womanhood, and most 18 year olds think they know all they need to at that stage. I think I certainly felt that way. The tour I took was so terrible I knew it would make a great (possibly funny) book someday. It wasn’t until I was grown and re-read the journal that I saw myself as an 18 year old complaining endlessly about the misadventures of the tour, not appreciating what was before me. I did see how much I loved my family for keeping their sense of humor and bond despite separation.

Our trip also included dumping that tour and heading to Athens, where my aunt, uncle and cousins were staying after being evacuated out of Jordan during wartime. The uncle character in the novel is based upon my own late uncle, who was a spy for the U.S. – but I had no idea as a teen that he was an important intelligence officer. I thought the idea of writing about the “normal” side of a spy’s family life was intriguing and lent an unusual element to Bridey’s story.

WHY THIS TITLE?: As I said, when you’re eighteen you’re pretty grown up — but not quite. You have so much more to learn. It’s only in retrospect that you realize things or find out the real story. I thought about calling the novel “Her Itinerary” but What You Don’t Know Now just fit.

WHY WOULD SOMEONE WANT TO READ IT? It’s definitely for adults at least over 18, due to the sexual content of a couple of scenes. Who should read it? Mothers, daughters, sisters, aunts, cousins, grandmothers, nieces; women who lived through the 1960’s; anyone who took a trip to Italy or Europe and found a romance (there are more women out there that did than you may imagine!). People who are interested in history, travel, operatic tenors and their incubation, Italy, the Vietnam War era, life in the 1960’s, or Greece. Or anyone who has faced the choice of giving up what you most want to keep. This is women’s fiction, and coming-of-age.

REVIEW COMMENTS:

“When I finished the book, my first thought was, ‘I hope there’s a sequel!’ I got very caught up in the protagonist, Bridey, as she navigated her way around Europe and a variety of firsts: falling in love with a romantic Italian, escaping from her well-meaning but over-protective mother, and struggling in a life-or-death situation. It’s been a long time since I’ve read a coming-of-age novel that I looked forward to picking up to see what happened next. The author does an excellent job developing a variety of characters while keeping the focus on Bridey. I can’t wait to see where Bridey’s life takes her.” — Jane Sutter Brandt, former Gannett editor.

“This debut loss of innocence/coming of age novel has romance, intrigue, romance, travel, romance, opera, romance, and the gorgeously portrayed Alessandro who catches the eye and heart of young Bridey McKenna. Marci Diehl’s smart, upscale writing makes this story real and terrific. A five star must read for lovers of romance, intrigue and remembrance of things past.” — Kathy Johncox, author, “What A Kiss Can Do.”

“A gem! I felt as if Bridey had packed me in her suitcase and taken me along on her adventures. Diehl writes with vivid exuberance in an entertaining and thought provoking way. I found myself indulging in “just one more chapter”. Would make a stunning movie. I hope there’s a sequel!” — Amazon 5-star review.

AUTHOR PROFILE: I’ve been writing since I was old enough to put sentences together and write letters. At ten, I wrote and illustrated my first novel, twenty pages of notebook paper  stapled together. I moved on to become the “geeky language nerd” in school, an inveterate note-passer (sometimes up to 6 pages long), comedy sketch writer, and winner of school awards for my editorials, short story and columns. I kept a “log” in a 3-subject spiral notebook of my experiences as an 18 year old on an ill-fated bus tour of Europe, which developed decades later into my debut novel, What You Don’t Know Now. I spent half my adult life traversing the nation as a PGA Tour Wife and traveling mother of four sons, writing for national, regional and local magazines on lifestyle, golf, travel, and humor. I’m also a multi-media writer for business when I’m not walking my dog, Sugar. Sometimes I go to movies just for the popcorn. I live in the beautiful Finger Lakes region of New York State.

AUTHOR COMMENTS: I hope something in the book touches readers. I would love it if a reader closed the book and said to herself, “I loved that.” I’d like them to feel they’ve lived in another time for a while, gone places they’ve never been – or if they have been, to remember their experience, feel whatever emotions that place brought.

SAMPLE CHAPTER: Read the first chapter on Amazon (ebook view): http://amzn.to/2kNgqup

LOCAL OUTLETS: Barnes & Noble — Pittsford NY WHERE ELSE TO BUY IT: Amazon: http://amzn.to/2kNgqup also Barnes & Noble;

Merge Publishing: http://mergepublishing.com/book-table/

. PRICE: Softcover: $15.99 Kindle: $3.99 Amazon paperback: $10.38

CONTACT THE AUTHOR:

Twitter: @writerdiehl.

Facebook : MarciDiehlBooks.

Pinterest: Marci Diehl

Black Hearts, White Bones

Black Hearts White Bones by [Furney, William Charles]

THE BOOK: “Black Hearts, White Bones.”

PUBLISHED IN: April 2017.

THE AUTHOR: William Charles Furney.

THE PUBLISHER:  Black Hearts Publishing.

SUMMARY:  Black Hearts White Bones is a “what if” novel about Anne Bonny and Mary Read, two very real pirates who lived in the early 18th Century.  The story begins where the sketchy historic records leave off.  Instead of being hanged along with Calico Jack Rackham (one of the best names in pirate history) and the rest of his crew, Anne and Mary both “pleaded their bellies,” delaying their executions until their babies were born.  The record shows that Mary died of “the fever” while still in prison but tells us nothing of Anne’s fate.  A prevalent and plausible theory is that her father – a plantation owner in Charles Town – paid a ransom to have her released from prison.

Author William Charles Furney with his Westies Duncan and Clair.The prologue of the story begins with Mary Read faking her death (reminiscent of The Count of Monte Cristo) and pledging to one day kill Anne Bonny for leaving her in prison.  The story resumes nine years later when Mary stumbles upon Anne who is living a life of obscurity in colonial Bath.  But instead of killing Anne, Mary Read decides to execute a more sinister plan before leaving Bath forever.  The story that follows is one of obsession, vengeance, betrayal, and self-realization.

Although Black Hearts White Bones abounds in history and suspense, it is always about Anne and Mary.  The tension between them is present throughout and little is what it appears to be.

THE BACK STORY:  Having been born and raised in the “Down East” region of coastal North Carolina, I grew up where local legends about pirates and their folklore live on to this day.  Many of my vacations growing up were spent in places like Nags Head, Cape Hatteras, Ocracoke, and Charleston.  The sports teams at East Carolina University – the closest college to where I lived – are called ECU Pirates and feature pirate logos and mascot.

About eight years ago I began coming across references to Anne Bonny and Mary Read in my reading and it struck me as odd that so little had been written about them.  How could two notorious women pirates be so unknown?  And what little information I could find in my research was either woefully unbelievable, dismissive, or condescending.  As someone who was raised by a strong woman and a man who respects them, I knew I had to write a story that would do them justice and in a serious way.  With Black Hearts White Bones, I think I achieved that goal.  If my efforts help them gain a more prominent place in history, then I will consider my story to be a very satisfying success.

WHY THIS TITLE?   The title is pure pirate imagery, meant to convey the darkness of the story and capture the reader’s imagination.  It also has a place in the story, but you’ll have to read it to find out what it is.

WHY SOMEONE WOULD WANT TO READ IT?  Because it’s a damn good story that has something for almost everyone.  It lives outside the box compared to almost everything else that is out there and it skewers clichés with a rapier – unless it is to make fun of them.  These are not the buccaneers your father told you about.

REVIEW COMMENTS:

“Bill Furney’s Black Hearts White Bones crafted a great pirate tale filled with adventure, treachery, and great twists.  Vivid, exciting and filled with colorful characters, this was an excellent yarn that gave substance to the ghostly figures of female pirates who are so poorly documented.  Though it is said in the history books, Mary Read did indeed die in prison soon after giving birth, this was an interesting case of “what if.” — Award winning author Carole P. Roman.

AUTHOR PROFILE:  Shortly after being born, I served in the U.S. Army as a tank commander where I learned how to blow junk up, eliminate bad guys with economy, and lead good men through chemical, biological, and radioactive environments.

Life was weird.

Whereas these skills prepared me for civilian life in metropolitan arcadias such as Chicago, L.A., and Philadelphia, I instead decided to go to a university of higher learning.  After arming myself with a BS degree from the University of Colorado’s School of Journalism in Boulder, I ventured out into the world as a reporter where I proceeded to hone my skills at pissing people off with the written word.

Life was better.

But as fate would have it, I finally grew up and took a real job working for state government as a public information officer, at first for the governor and later with public health.  Despite not being a metrosexual bureaucrat and developing a reputation for telling overly self-important, political appointees they were full of beans, I did pretty good.

Regrets?  A few, but I never punched anybody.  Not once.

Along the way, I actually did accomplish stuff.  I earned degrees in public relations and advertising.  I became one of the first five people in the country to become a Certified Communicator in Public Health.

I had my own column in the Jacksonville Daily News.  I was a director of public relations for private industry and the director of communication for several government agencies.  I established two public affairs offices where none previously existed; one for the State Health Director’s Office and the other in the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response – the state agency created in 2001 to oversee preparedness efforts associated with biological attacks and pandemic outbreaks.  (Truly weird that I actually did end up using some of my military training.)

As a public health communication expert I coordinated or participated in the media/public information responses to health crises involving AIDS, anthrax, SARS, E-coli, Pfiesteria, Brucelosis, Legionnaires’ disease, SIDS, Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Small Pox, West Nile Virus and numerous hurricanes.  I also collaborated with the CDC Office of Communication on several health issues and was a certified trainer of their Emergency Risk Communication Program.  I was a member and president of the National Public Health Information Coalition – twice.  (Woot!)

I also once yelled “Arnold!  Over here!” to make sure Arnold Schwarzenegger got in the right car on his national fitness campaign tour and I once saw Pink at the airport.  I think.  It was a woman with pink hair, for sure.

AUTHOR COMMENTS:  Black Hearts White Bones is a wild ride that took me more than five years to write.  I conducted at least three hours of research for every hour of writing, and I believe it is part of what makes this a superior read.  My biggest wish is that people enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing.

SAMPLE CHAPTER:   Amazon Kindle shows the first three chapters.  Click on the book’s cover for the sample pages if it does not open automatically: http://tinyurl.com/l5g2qn2

WHERE TO BUY IT:  Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/k6k42zp  Soon to be available on Audible.com
PRICE:  Kindle  $2.99    Paperback  $19.99.

CONTACT THE AUTHOR: eMail: WCFurney@gmail.com  Website: www.billfurney.com

Gone to Pot

Gone to Pot by [Craig, Jennifer]YOUR BOOK: Gone to Pot

THE AUTHOR: Jennifer Craig

THE EDITOR: Carolyn Jackson, Kathryn Cole,

THE PUBLISHER: Second Story Press, Toronto, Canada

Jennifer CraigSUMMARY: After losing her job and learning she might also lose her house because of a bad investment, Jess, a fiercely independent and hilariously wry BC grandma, resorts to growing pot in her basement to make ends meet. She then has to juggle her public life as a grandmother and member of the town’s senior women’s group – The Company of Crones – with her secret life as a pot grower. The unusual characters she meets along the way include Swan, the enigmatic young woman who introduces her to the grower’s world, and Marcus, the socially awkward “gardener” who shows her the tricks of the trade. Both of her new young friends are more than they appear, and Jess’ adventures in pot growing break down barriers in both her old and new circles. The delightful outcome of an almost legitimate business leaves Jess and her associates flushed with success.

 

THE BACK STORY: Nelson is known as the Pot Capitol of Canada, so when I moved here, I couldn’t help hearing about it. I was intrigued and found out more.

WHY SOMEONE WOULD WANT TO READ IT: Because it’s funny.

REVIEW COMMENTS:

“Gone to Pot is an entertaining read, thanks largely to Craig’s dynamic writing style. Characters all differ greatly from each other in age and disposition, but dialogue is well parsed and believable, Craig making the seamless transition between voices look easy….  A great read for any age, reminding us that the elderly can be vibrant, active, and involved.” – Foreword Reviews 5/5 review

AUTHOR PROFILE: Jennifer Craig, from Nelson, is the author of four published books: a memoir, a book on vaccination, and two novels. She trained as a nurse in Yorkshire in the 1950s, emigrated to Canada in 1961 and attended a university as a mature, maybe overripe, student. She developed a rather jaded view of the proceedings. Later, as a faculty member, the jade took on a shine that certainly influenced her writing. She is now retired, lives a contented life with a bichon frise and is happy to have two of her six grandchildren live nearby.

5 Fun Facts You Don’t Know About Me:

1. I rode a Lambretta scooter in the fifties.

2. To celebrate a hip replacement in 2000, I walked El Camino de Santiago in 2002.

3. My first financial investment was in a French fry machine. Within three months I lost my investment.

4. My first (and only) blind date had no teeth.

5. I tried to play the bagpipes in my sixties but didn’t have enough puff to inflate the bag.

AUTHOR COMMENTS: The older I get, the more crazy the world becomes.

SAMPLE CHAPTER: https://www.amazon.ca/Gone-Pot-JenniferCraig/dp/1772600342/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1491933485&sr=1-1

LOCAL OUTLETS: Otter Books, Nelson, BC

WHERE ELSE TO BUY IT: Amazon

PRICE: $19.95