Weather Report, Sept. 13

Albino redwood branches, photo from Atlas Obscura

Our currently featured books, “Praying With the Enemy,” by Steven T. Collis and “Eaglebait,”: by Susan Coryell, can be found by scrolling down below this post, or by clicking the author’s name on our Authors page.

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UPCOMING ON SNOWFLAKES IN A BLIZZZARD, SEPTEMBER 13-19.

“THE WHITE TREE QUARTET,” BY MARY PACIFICO CURTIS.

Writes Mary: “The White Tree Quartet weaves together four different stories, each its own poem cycle. Inevitably, the reader will wonder, as I did, how these fit together in a single book and what the arc of that book might be. In one sense, they don’t ‘fit’ together, but instead they bump against each other in a study of one life’s random and selected experiences held to a light and prized for their differences. Ultimately, however the arc expresses journeys within a life that is itself a journey in progress.

“The crowning synchronicity as I was collecting these poems into four cycles came with a story on NPR about albino redwood trees in the Santa Cruz mountains. Scientists recently found that the white thought to be fungus was instead the lower part of the tree absorbing toxins from the soil and preserving the living tree above. “

“BUDDHA WAS A COWBOY,” BY JUNIOR BURKE.

A progressive, alternative university is targeted for takeover by conservative forces in this satiric tale.

Aaron Motherway is a Hollywood screenwriter who, while recovering from a traffic accident, is tapped to run the arts program at Parami University, located in Pearl Handle, Wyoming. What Aaron doesn’t know is that he is being set up to fail by various duplicitous forces, and he finds himself immersed in a culture war infused with sexual misconduct, embezzlement, political opportunism, and potential mass murder, played out in a climate of comedic dysfunction and absurdity.

“THE VIOLA FACTOR,” BY SHERIDAN BROWN

“The Viola Factor” takes place at a time when the country faced division and growth after the American Civil War. Viola Knapp Ruffner struggled with what was just and fair, becoming a little-known confidant for a young black scholar from Virginia. But Viola was much more than a teacher; she was a mother, wife, game changer, and friend. With her mother’s dying wish, a young woman alone, she left her New England roots. This is a story of trauma and love in the South while battling for justice and the rightful education of the enslaved and once enslaved. African American leader Booker T. Washington called her his friend and model for life.

Published by

bridgetowriters

Recently retired after 35 years with the News & Advance newspaper in Lynchburg, VA, now re-inventing myself as a novelist/nonfiction writer and writing coach in Lake George, NY.

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